Clarence Thomas says 'tremendously bad' abortion draft leak changed the Supreme Court 'forever'

A draft decision leaked earlier this month by the US Supreme Court has fundamentally transformed the judiciary and potentially wreaked irreparable damage, Judge Clarence Thomas said during a conference in Dallas Friday night.
"I think what happened in court is tremendously bad...I wonder how long we're going to have these institutions at the rate that we're undermining them," Thomas said at the Old Parkland Conference.
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The leak — not the potential implication of the Roe v. Overthrowing Wade -- may have done irreparable damage to people's trust in the institution, the veteran justice said.
“When you lose that trust, especially in the institution that I am in, it fundamentally changes the institution. You start looking over your shoulder. It's like a kind of infidelity that you can explain it but you can't undo it," Thomas adds.
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The High Court's secrecy had been an integral part of the court process, allowing judges to deliberate free from outside pressure, he added, noting that members of the court did not believe such a leak could even occur.
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"Oh, that's impossible. Nobody would ever do that," he said, theorizing how people felt about the Supreme Court's exclusivity before the leak.
"Now that trust or belief is gone forever," Thomas claimed.
Thomas also pointed out that there has been a recent trend of undermining the Supreme Court, questioning its integrity and impartiality — and a new phenomenon of citizens coming to members' homes and holding them personally accountable.
However, the judiciary said the trend was with liberals and that conservatives had not acted in the same way.
ALEXANDRIA, VA - MAY 9: Pro-abortion rights advocates took to the streets to host a protest outside the home of Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito in the Fort Hunt neighborhood on Monday, May 9, 2022 in Alexandria, VA. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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"They would never visit the homes of Supreme Court justices unless things were going as we wished. We didn't have tantrums. I think it's ... our duty to always act appropriately and not pay everything back," Thomas said.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Clarence Thomas
Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court

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