COVID-19 Crisis Has Changed How Americans Live

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Consumer Reports has been tracking how the coronavirus pandemic has changed the daily lives of Americans since early March. The CR survey polled a nationally representative sample of Americans monthly, asking about the virus's impact on jobs, finances, social life, shopping, and more.
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Americans are concerned
General concern about the spread of the coronavirus in respondents' local areas in the following month remained consistently high through the second half of 2020. Concern peaked in July, subsided in August, and rebuilt in the following months.
Emotional and financial impact
Amid the heartbreaking death toll from COVID-19 and the ongoing physical health problems of many survivors, the pandemic has also severely affected the emotional and financial well-being of many Americans.
Behavior has changed
A majority of Americans say they would feel at least somewhat safe going to the doctor or dentist in person, but far fewer Americans would feel similarly safe traveling by plane or going to a gym.
This multimode survey was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago using a nationally representative sample of 2,851 adults in the United States. The last survey was conducted in English and Spanish from November 5th to 16th, 2020. The survey was led by Karen Jaffe, Associate Director of Survey Research at Consumer Reports, and Tess Yanisch, Associate Research Research Associate at Consumer Reports. (Download a PDF with the full survey results.)
Survey from October 2020
To monitor the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the habits and attitudes of Americans, the American Experiences Survey team at Consumer Reports again surveyed a nationally representative sample of Americans. This time, 2,670 adults in the United States were surveyed between October 8 and 26.
The concern remains high
As COVID-19 cases rose again across the country, the majority of Americans continued to express concerns about the spread of the virus in their local areas.
Most Americans would wait to get vaccinated
Only 12 percent of Americans said they would feel comfortable immediately after being released if they received a COVID-19 vaccination. The majority said they would wait at least three months or not get it at all if asked how soon they would be comfortable after it was released.
Fewer Americans are very likely to get a vaccine
In October, fewer than 1 in 3 people said they were “very likely” to receive a vaccine. (Note that the poll was conducted before the November election and the recent release of the Pfizer trial data.)
Black Americans are much less confident about vaccination safety
Black respondents were much less confident in the safety of a COVID-19 vaccine if one became available today than Spanish and white respondents.
This multimode survey was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago using a nationally representative sample of 2,670 adults in the United States. The survey was conducted in English and Spanish from October 8-26, 2020. The survey was led by Karen Jaffe, Associate Director of Survey Research at Consumer Reports, and Jane Manweiler, Senior Research Associate at CR.
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