Discontinued duds and design disasters: These are the 30 worst cars of all time

Discontinued clothes and design disasters: These are the 30 worst cars of all time
You've probably seen some classy vehicles cruising the Autobahn and your fair share of seedy numbers that make you shake your head.
You probably want a car that has staying power, not one that stays in the garage because you're too embarrassed to take it for a spin.
The automotive experts at Edmunds.com have compiled a list of the 50 worst cars. They based their rankings on the cars' attributes, their durability, and their negative impact on American car culture.
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Here are the 30 worst cars of all time according to Edmund's ranking.
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30. 2002 JEWEL
Badchuckie / YouTube
To be honest, calling this vehicle a finished product is a bit of a stretch. Developed by Michigan-based Global Electric Motorcars, this low-speed electric car has no doors, hatches or side protection.
It's essentially a street-legal version of a golf cart, better suited to the 18th hole in Augusta than a busy freeway. It's available in two- or four-seater editions that don't have safety ratings, and its top speed is 25 mph. Imagine being stuck behind this traffic anomaly. You wouldn't live it out.
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The vehicle was initially adapted for utility and commercial use but never really caught on.
29. 1970 Triumph Deer
The big disappointment with this vehicle was the Triumph V8. The 3.0 liter engine was a monstrosity and failed to restrict combustion internally. In addition, timing chains broke, aluminum heads were constantly warped and the main bearings seized up from one moment to the next.
The body of this open vintage number included a T-bar used to fuse the roll bar to the windshield. The windows were framed in chrome.
While its appearance was relatively classy, ​​it was made up of shoddy engineering. It was fun to drive, but you didn't know how long this ride would take.
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While it was considered innovative at the time, it's easy to see why it quickly became obsolete.
28. 1950 Crosley Hotshot
The name of this car was a hit, but the car itself wasn't. Its 750cc engine was the pain point, as its block was welded together rather than cast.
The vehicle weighed more than 1,100 pounds but was only 145 inches long, making for a diminutive, dumpy aesthetic. Considering it was built by a radio manufacturer, buyers might have been wise to keep expectations low. The maximum speed was 50 km/h.
The vehicle simply never caught on with buyers. In 1952, just three years after its creation, Crosley discontinued the Hotshot.
27. 1971 Plymouth Cricket
CarAndClassic / Twitter
Plymouth's answer to the Chevy Vega and Ford Pinto, this number mirrored the British Hillman Avenger and tended to self-destruct without warning. It had a 1250cc engine and an automatic transmission that lacked inspiration.
This small car featured a respectable color palette and styling appropriate for the time, including a quad headlight grille. But Plymouth cricket only lasted two years and had little to justify its existence.
26. 1954 Nash Metropolitan
This vehicle's 1.2-liter engine came to the rescue given its flimsy design traits. It ran well on inferior petrol, but it wasn't a trustworthy proposition for drivers trying to negotiate corners.
The design was conceived in Wisconsin and built in the UK. Available in red and primed finishes, it looked shiny. But without the required power behind it, the design didn't matter.
It is often referred to as America's first small car. The Metropolitan lasted until 1962.
25. 1977 Lincoln Versailles
This vehicle was Ford's first foray into compact luxury vehicles, released in response to the Cadillac Seville. What buyers got, however, was a camouflaged Granada with a Continental bump and a Mark IV grille.
It was sorely lacking in ingenuity and refinement in design, with a more modest interior, thick padding on top and two-tone paintwork. It was easy to tell what the Ford manufacturers were doing.
Only 15,000 Versailles were sold in the first year, and production ceased in 1980.
24. 1976 Dodge Aspen/Plymouth Volare
Greg Gjerdingen/Flickr
Introduced by Chrysler during a disastrous financial period, these vehicles were at one point the most frequently recalled vehicles.
The culprits were loose bonnets, engines with faulty acceleration, quickly tiring brake components and defective belt tensioners.
Despite its aerodynamic interior and the roundness of its design, the vehicle was clever. But it was also a rust magnet.
Despite this, these compacts were voted Car of the Year by MotorTrend in 1976 and were very popular.
23. 2007 Chevrolet Malibu Maxx SS
Powered by a 3.9-liter V-6 engine, this sedan/station wagon hybrid had its share of drawbacks, including lack of steering flexibility, questionable braking and no manual transmission.
While it's by no means ugly, this Chevrolet has a bland design, especially inside. It lacks style and utility, although it offers a fair bit of cargo space with a simple, functional layout.
The vehicle is best known for its safety ratings thanks to its multiple airbags. In addition, it has four-wheel anti-lock brakes. But if style and control are important to you, there's not much to look for here.
22. 1990 Infiniti M30 Convertible
This Nissan performance vehicle suffered from the Sonar suspension, which it borrowed from its Maxima model. Although this system included sensor technology for reading road surfaces, it was far from ideal. The drive also left a lot to be desired.
This is the American version of the Nissan Leopard in Japan. It was a near-luxury car with few luxury features.
Stylistically, the two-door coupe lacked space, especially for cargo and in the rear seats. Angular design and a restricted cockpit did not offer comfort.
21. 1996 Ford Taurus
Joe Clarke/YouTube
Ford was bold with this remake of the Taurus, but it went broke very quickly. Its 12-valve Vulcan V6 engine was not as geared as its predecessor. The 24-valve Duratec was even more expensive for Ford manufacturers and did not achieve satisfactory speeds.
The overall design was unnecessarily complex. It panned for the fences, from a rear oval window to an integrated control panel to the fish-like exterior. It hit massively.
Car enthusiasts were reluctant because of its costly fittings, as more than half of dealer sales were limited to the fleets. As soon as this happened, Ford's reputation in the sedan market sank.
20. 1987 Cadillac Allante
Equipped with 170 hp, this was Cadillac's supposedly bold response to the rise of Mercedes and Jaguar in the two-seater market. The result was a front-wheel drive roadster that was ridiculously expensive thanks to its Italian-built body. The powertrain was built in the United States.
From a design point of view, it lacked sporting qualities, which is necessary when you ask exorbitant prices.
Despite credible anti-lock braking and handling, the Allante received a lot of headwind for its cost. According to a classic car auction site Hemmings, it went for $54,700. In comparison, the base Cadillac Eldorado coupe at the time started at $23,740.
19. 1978 Fiat Strada/Ritmo
This hatchback was so poorly received that Fiat pulled out of the US market for nearly three decades from 1983, according to Edmunds. Imprecise and stiff steering and unconvincing engines could have something to do with it.
The design of this front-wheel drive subcompact was shaky and unconventional to say the least. Outside of its native Spain and Italy, the Strada/Ritmo didn't sell as American and UK markets aren't biting.
18. 1975 AMC pacemaker
CZmarlin/Wikimedia Commons
The AMC Pacer's archaic and simplistic powertrain was a good reason to avoid this vehicle, which offered drivers very little comfort, not even air conditioning.
This little AMC model has been called one of the worst designed vehicles of its time, with a quirky wide body dubbed "The Flying Fishbowl".
The two-door compact only lasted until 1980.
17. 2011 Aston Martin Cygnet
With a 1.33 liter VVT engine, the Aston Martin Cygnet should be a modern luxury solution for urban mobility. It's safe to say that this redesigned Toyota iQ was too expensive and lacked the key features to be taken seriously.
The story goes on

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