'Do you feel any remorse?': Officer charged in killing of George Floyd confronted while buying groceries in Minnesota

Screengrab / Twitter
One of the four officials charged with murdering George Floyd was confronted by a buyer buying food in Minnesota on Saturday.
26-year-old J. Alexander Keung was released on Friday evening from the Hennepin County Prison with a $ 750,000 bond. He was approached by a woman when she went shopping in a Cub Foods grocery store the next day.
"So you're not in jail and you're shopping comfortably in Cub Foods. As if you hadn't done anything," said the woman who confronted him and filmed the incident.
"Did you think people wouldn't recognize you?" She added. "You killed someone in cold blood. You don't have the right to be here. "
Josiah
@ jk3rd_
See who my sister caught at Cub Foods in Plymouth. J. Alexander Keung, one of the officers who coldly lynched #GeorgeFloyd.
83.9K
8:32 AM - June 21, 2020Minneapolis, MN
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46.4K people talk about it
Keung replies, "I understand. I will have my things paid for. "
The woman replies: "No, we don't want you to get your things, we want you to be locked up."
Keung is accused of supporting second degree murder for his part in Floyd's death. According to court records, Keung helped Mr. Floyd be held on the ground during an attempted arrest for allegedly using a fake $ 20 bill.
During the fatal incident, another officer, Derek Chauvin, held his knee to Floyd's neck despite constant requests that he be unable to breathe.
"Do you feel remorse for what you've done?" she asks him.
The video was posted on Twitter by a user named Josiah, who wrote, "Look who my sister caught at Cub Foods in Plymouth. J. Alexander Keung, one of the officials who coldly lynched #GeorgeFloyd."
It has been shared tens of thousands of times since then.
Chauvin, the official who knelt on Mr. Floyd's neck, is charged with second-degree murder. Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and Kueng were indicted earlier this month for helping with the murder. All officials were fired from their jobs.
The murder of Floyd on May 25 triggered worldwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice, which continue to this day.

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