Europe launches unprecedented vaccination campaign

From Florence to Frankfurt, from Paris to Prague, a cross-border vaccination program of unprecedented proportions was launched in Europe on Sunday (December 27th).
After European governments were criticized for lack of cooperation at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, there is now hope that a coordinated response will ensure an even distribution of vaccines in the region - home to 450 million people.
The EU has signed contracts for more than two billion doses of vaccine and has set a goal that all adults will be vaccinated by 2021.
At the head of the queue in Germany on Sunday was 101-year-old Gertrud Haase, who received Berlin's first vaccination in her nursing home.
"It's very dangerous, we hear and read about it, and so many people are dying in other houses. It's terrible, and that's why it's so good that we can be vaccinated against it. It's a great benefit to all of us who we." Live here. "
In Rome, nurse Claudia Alivernini was among three health care workers who received Italy's first footage of a vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech.
She urged other Italians to follow suit, saying "medicine and science are the only resources we have".
Surveys show that there is a high level of reluctance to use the vaccine across Europe, leading the 27-nation leaders of the European Union to promote it as the best chance to get back to normal life next year.
While Europe has some of the best-resourced health services in the world, some countries have put retired doctors back into service due to the scale of the operation, while others have relaxed the rules on getting vaccinated.
Outside the EU, Great Britain, Switzerland and Serbia have already started vaccinating their citizens in recent weeks.
Video transcript
- From Florence to Frankfurt, from Paris to Prague, a cross-border vaccination program of unprecedented proportions was launched in Europe on Sunday. After European governments were criticized for a lack of cooperation at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, there is now hope that a coordinated response will ensure an even distribution of vaccines in the region, home to 450 million people.
The EU has signed contracts for more than 2 billion doses of vaccine and has set a goal that all adults will be vaccinated by 2021. On Sunday, 101-year-old Gertrud Haase was at the helm in Germany, who received Berlin's first vaccination at her nursing home.
GERTRUD HAASE: [SPEAK GERMAN]
Interpreter: It's very dangerous. We hear and read about it and so many people are dying in other houses. It's terrible, and that's why it's so good that we can get vaccinated against it. It's a great benefit to all of us who live here.
- In Rome, nurse Claudia Alivernini was among three health care workers who received Italy's first footage of a vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech.
CLAUDIA ALIVERNINI: [SPEAK ITALIAN]
- She urged other Italians to follow her example, saying medicine and science are the only resources we have.
CLAUDIA ALIVERNINI: [SPEAK ITALIAN]
- According to surveys, there is a high level of reluctance to use the vaccine among the population across Europe, leading the 27-nation leaders of the European Union to promote it as the best chance to return to normal life next year . While Europe has some of the best-resourced health services in the world, some countries have put retired medics back into service due to the scale of the operation, while others have eased the rules on being allowed to fire the shots. Outside the EU, Great Britain, Switzerland and Serbia have already started vaccinating their citizens in recent weeks.

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