Golfer Bryson DeChambeau Explains How Gaining 20 Pounds of Muscle Transformed His Game

Photo credit: Getty / Bryson DeChambeau - Getty Images
From men's health
Bryson DeChambeau has attracted a lot of attention for good reason since the return of professional golf. For one, he is jacked up like hell and has an additional 20 pounds of muscle. He also drives longer than ever, including 367 yards at the recent Charles Schwab Challenge, which leads to a lot of talk about the work he has done in quarantine.
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However, according to the five-time PGA Tour winner, this transformation took much longer.
"Eight months ago I said you know what? I want to try to get stronger because I know that an advantage can be achieved," said DeChambeau. "If I could be like Happy Gilmore or Kyle Berkshire, hit over 400 yards and just hit it? That is a huge advantage. So I started and I've been healthier and stronger since then."
DeChambeau knew that building strength would help him with the speed and length of his ride, but that wasn't his only motivation. In the past eight months, a longer-term lifestyle change has also been sought.
"I can get up without feeling stiff in the morning," he says. "I woke up every morning and felt terrible because my abs didn't work properly and my back ached because it overcompensated. When I started training the body proportionally, it really showed me a new life."
Photo credit: Adam Hurley
DeChambeau has been working closely with Greg Roskopf at Muscle Activation Techniques (MAT) for two years to develop strength through mobility. Over the past eight months, he has increased the intensity of this workout and spent more time building symmetrical strength at its core through exercises focused on trunk rotation, trunk flexion, leg flexion, back extension and side flexion.
He took Roskopf's motto "You are only as strong as your weakest link" on board and isolated and trained every muscle in his body. "Except for the fingers," he laughs. That also means having to exercise every night. He explains that he does not take days off because a good night's sleep is the rest he needs.
"If I were training in the morning, I wouldn't be able to play golf that day," he says. "I play golf and then I see training in the evening as my way of dealing with pain that needs to be remedied."
While many athletes would accompany such an intense training plan with an equally strict nutritional regime, DeChambeau keeps things simple. "I've tried the keto diet and all of these things, but I've found that it works for me as long as I keep a carb: protein ratio of 2: 1," he says. "Obviously, it won't work if you want to lean down. But if I run 8 miles every day, I haven't gained fat."
"People think I have all these crazy theories, but if you really break it down to the basic principles of my experiments, that's a lot of common sense," he adds.
The results certainly speak for themselves. DeChambeau currently has an average distance of 323.8 meters and is on track to break the PGA Tour record for an average distance (currently held by Hank Kühne). And he wants to continue.
"I don't know the endgame for me," he says. "I will continue to train and get stronger every day and continue speed training as long as I can tolerate it. As long as everything grows proportionally, I really don't know how fast I can go. So I will continue to push the limits."
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