"I think that white people should stand up and say racism is wrong" - kids speak on racism

Everyone, including the children, is watching the world react to George Floyd's death.
The video incident of May 25 triggered widespread protests in the United States and other countries.
The case was convicted of murder by medical investigators, and Derek Chauvin, the white officer, was charged with second-degree murder.
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Eight-year-old Nia Madison was angry at the murder of Floyd and "many others," adding, "Shouldn't the police protect us?"
Many expressed sadness, including 11-year-old Dexter Walker Smith: "I cannot believe that people treat someone else just because they have a different color. They are just police officers who abuse power."
And 6-year-old Rhys Wagar said: "They choked him and he asked for help and they didn't let go."
The Fishers, Indiana teenager, Peyton Daniels, said: "Watching this video every 8 minutes and 46 seconds was just anger for me because every 8 minutes and 46 seconds was just anger."
Children use their voices and gifts to protest. The nine-year-old Canadian resident Inès Schlag wants to use her voice to do something to educate and protect. She had a special message to the black community: "I know that you are sad and hurt. Know that you are not alone." I am with you. "
Brooklyn teenager Lucas Ritchie-Shatz and friends use social media to raise money for demonstrators.
"I created an Instagram account with some of my other friends who are artists called Artists for George Floyd. And we sell art commissions and one-offs to support the protests, bail, legal and mutual aid funds."
Jersey City, New Jersey 10-year-old William Fuller-Rhatigan heard his voice on foot and with a pen.
"I protest. I wrote an editorial about what happened to George Floyd and how we can all get together."
Overall, most of the children hoped for the future of racial equality.
Caroline O., 8, of Texas, hopes that "all people of different races can come together".
(Production: Alicia Powell)
Video transcript
NIA MADISON: I am so angry that Mr. George Floyd and Ms. Breonna Taylor and many others were killed by the police for this reason. Shouldn't the police protect us?
WILLIAM FULLER-RHATIGAN :: My feelings would be anger and frustration because a lot has happened. And it only makes me sad. It's not just George Floyd that happened to that. It happened 40 years ago to earn the cut.
DEXTER WALKER SMITH: I'm really angry and sad that ... I also can't believe that people treat another person just because they're different colors. It's just police officers who abuse power.
RHYS WAGAR: Sorry.
- Why are you sad?
RHYS WAGAR: Because they choked him and asked for help and didn't let go.
PEYTON DANIELS: Watching this video every 8 minutes and 46 seconds is only - for every 8 minutes and 46 seconds it's just anger for me. Because I just keep watching it. And other people too - doesn't mean that no other people should see that. It’s just devastating.
LUCAS RITCHIE-SHATZ: I think what happened to George Floyd was terrible. And I don't think anyone should be treated like that.
INES BLOW: My name is Ines. I am 9 years old. And I'm going to make a difference using my voice to educate and protect. For the black community, I know that you are sad and hurt. Know that you are not alone. I am with you.
WILLIAM FULLER-RHATIGAN :: I protest. I wrote an editorial about what happened to George Floyd and how we can all get together.
LUCAS RITCHIE-SHATZ: Together with some of my other friends who are artists, I created an Instagram account called Artists for George Floyd. And we sell art commissions and one-offs to support protests in support of bail funds, legal funds and mutual aid funds.
PEYTON DANIELS: What I've done to help my community and even to help the Black Lives Matter movement is that I've signed every petition that concerns this whole situation.
CAROLINE O: My hope for the future is that people treat people the way they want to be treated and that all people of different races can come together.
RHYS WAGAR: That everyone is treated the same as others - like whites.
NIA MADISON: My hope for the future is that, like Dr. King said to be judged on the content of our character, not on the color of our skin.
DEXTER WALKER SMITH: I hope for the future that people will realize this moment, these protests, act educated and use this to use their intellect rather than their ignorance as excuses.
EMMA GRENE: I think at some point we should all try to see that we are all the same people. Because in the future we can all look back and say, oh wow, I can't believe we did that. Because we are all the same race and the same people. And nothing is really different than the color of our skin.

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