Idaho murders: Law enforcement should not dismiss 'incel' angle, experts say

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More than two weeks after four University of Idaho students were stabbed to death in their off-campus apartment, police have still not identified a suspect or found a murder weapon.
Forensic psychologist Kris Mohandie said the brutality of the killings, combined with the victims' appearance as popular students on campus, leads him to believe law enforcement is closely scrutinizing the suspect, who may be an "incel." should take.
Incel, short for involuntary celibacy, refers to a misogynist subculture of romantically frustrated men who often share their anger online at not being able to find a partner.
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"There is a lot of hatred and anger evident in these crimes - the level of violence, the determination, the apparent hostility in such a personal attack," Mohandie told Fox News Digital. "That's a lot of intensity. So it's not incompatible with someone who has that kind of motivation. There's something hateful and angry about it.”
A shared photo showing the crime scene and victims including University of Idaho student Ethan Chapin, 20; Xana Kernodle, 20; Madison Mogen, 21; and Kaylee Goncalves, 21.
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Ethan Chapin, 20, Kaylee Goncalves, 21, Xana Kernodle, 20, and Madison Mogen, 21, were all stabbed to death between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. on November 13.
TIMETABLE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO MURDERS: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE SLAUGHTER OF FOUR STUDENTS
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Authorities believe the attack was "targeted," but they have not identified who was attacked or why they believe this is the case. Additionally, prior to the killings, Goncalves made statements that she "may have had a stalker," but authorities have been unable to confirm those claims.
“These are children, grown children living their lives, experiencing happiness, being spontaneous and carefree. And that's going to stimulate someone who either felt entitled to have a relationship with one or more of them," Mohandie said.
"For individuals who feel like they're looking inside from the outside...it will breed envy and hatred."
An empty parking lot in front of the home where four University of Idaho students were murdered more than two weeks ago.
MURDERS IN IDAHO: TWO WEEKS HAVE PASSED SINCE FOUR COLLEGE STUDENTS WERE FIRST BURNED IN AN OFF-CAMPUS HOUSE
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Sarah Daly, a crime researcher at Saint Vincent College who has studied the subculture of involuntarily celibate women, noted that it would be premature to say that the killer in this case was from the Incel community, but the circumstances surrounding the murders could potentially provide clues.
"I can well imagine how people might suspect an 'Incel killer' in this case, especially since the four victims are young and attractive, which fits with the 'Chad' and 'Stacy' references Incels often make in their Use forums," Daly told Fox News Digital.
Daly noted that most men who identify as incels are more likely to pose a suicide risk than a homicide risk, but there have been some instances of real-world violence from the community.
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Shortly before killing 10 people by mowing them down with a rental car in Toronto, Canada, in April 2018, 25-year-old Alek Minassian posted on Facebook that the "Incel Rebellion has already begun."
In that Facebook post, Minassian was referring to Elliot Rodger, a 22-year-old man who murdered six people, including two women, outside a sorority house during a 2014 shooting spree in Isla Vista, California. In the months leading up to this attack, he wrote a 137-page manifesto about his hatred of women, according to the Associated Press.
James Fitzgerald, a former FBI criminal profiler, said detectives are likely already investigating whether the suspect may be an incel.
"While most of them aren't violent, some have violent ideas and they want to make threats and actually take action against people," Fitzgerald told Fox News on Friday.
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"Is it possible that you saw the young women here as 'Stacys'? This is the nickname for attractive women. Or the young man Ethan, as 'Chad'.
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Investigators have received more than 1,000 leads, and Moscow Police Chief James Fry said last week that they are "considering all possibilities" during the investigation.

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