Just Say 'Hey Siri, I'm Getting Pulled Over' to Record Police Interactions

Photo credit: GoodLifeStudio - Getty Images
From the popular mechanics
An iOS shortcut called "I'm Getting Pulled Over" can automatically record your interactions with the local police.
The app turns off music playback and uses your camera to take a picture. It can send the record and your location to an emergency contact.
Although the acronym has been around since 2018, it was brought back into circulation in Minneapolis last month after George Floyd's murder by police.
The next time you are stopped for speeding or other traffic violation, you can use an iOS shortcut on your iPhone to covertly record your full police interaction. This will not only help hold the authorities accountable - similar to a body camera - but could also be necessary evidence of misconduct or police brutality.
While the acronym "I'm Getting Pulled Over" has been around since 2018, it has increased again in the past few weeks after George Floyd's murder in Minneapolis last month.
"It just ... records things. It's absolutely constitutional to record the police, and if they do their jobs as they should be, there's no problem for them," creator Robert Petersen wrote in a Tuesday Twitter reply. "I would like to add that I spoke to some officials and none of them had any problems with it."
To start it all you have to do is say "Hey Siri, I'm going to run over" and your iPhone will start 18 different actions. The link starts immediately with the recording with your front-facing camera, dims your phone to zero percent brightness, pauses music or noise in the background, deactivates "Do not disturb" and sends your specific location and the recording to one of your emergency contacts.
If for any reason the cop in question does not like you to record - even though you are legally protected - the video will be immediately saved in your iCloud or DropBox account so that deletion of the video from your iPhone is won. Do not destroy the record.

DesiBAE aka Big Horchata
@sarcasticstyle
Apparently, iPhones have a police link and it does a number of things when you tell Siri that you are run over ...?

This is really important, if it is legitimate, all of my iPhone people have to see and share this.
355
04:41 - June 10, 2020
Twitter Ads info and privacy
270 people talk about it

Of course, you will need to install the shortcut first and run a few test runs to ensure that all of your permissions have been set up in advance.
? How do you download it
The iOS shortcut is separate from the native Siri app, so you should first install the shortcut iOS app. This is a new feature for devices with iOS 12 or higher. So make sure your software is up to date.
Next, download the I'm Getting Pulled Over link.
Go to Settings> Shortcuts> and switch Allow untrusted shortcuts to On.
Go to the gallery in the Shortcuts app and scroll down until you see the "I'm going to run over" link.
Tap Add untrusted shortcut.
Select your emergency contact and then tap Done.
Unfortunately, it doesn't look like there is an Android equivalent. However, there are apps with similar concepts. For example, you can download the ACLU Blue app from the Google Play market.
With this app you can record police officers and share the videos in a public forum on Twitter. It also includes helpful tips on your rights when stopped, the lawfulness of recording authorities, and protest-related information.
You might like it too
This device can send messages without cellular service
The best portable grills for cooking anywhere
The best video game in the year you were born

Click to receive the most important news as a notification!

Last News

Ethiopia declares victory as military takes Tigray capital

Europe's Christmas dilemma: risk empty chairs next year?

Cher flies in to rescue world's loneliest elephant from Islamabad zoo

From small businesses to farmers, middle India is driving demand

The kid performers who went viral in 2016 singing at a Donald Trump rally are reworking their routine to honor Joe Biden

Undocumented and Pregnant: Why Women Are Afraid to Get Prenatal Care