Kanye and His Antisemitic Friends Storm Out of Live Right Wing Podcast

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Kanye West was joined by Holocaust denier Nick Fuentes and white supremacist Milo Yiannopoulos on Monday's episode of the Timcast IRL podcast. While speaking to Tim Pool, the host of the YouTube channel with 1.4 million subscribers and a largely right-wing audience, West dove into a rant about the recent media backlash surrounding his anti-Semitic comments.
"I thought I was more Malcolm X, but I found out I'm more MLK. Since I'm being hosed down by the press and financially every day, I'm just standing there," West said during the live recording. "When I found out they were trying to put me in jail, it was like a dog bit my arm and I almost shed a tear. Nearly. But I walked through them anyway.”
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Pool added by telling West he agreed that "they were extremely unfair," leading West to ask what the host meant by "they." After Pool clarified that he meant the "corporate press," Fuentes, Pool, and Kanye seem to disagree as to whether the press is to blame. Shortly after, West got up and stormed out of the podcast studio, with Yiannopoulos and Fuentes rushing after him. Later, a member of Pool's team came on screen and informed the host that their three guests had departed.
At the beginning of the podcast, West also detailed his meeting with former President Donald Trump. West said it was originally scheduled for October, but after Trump announced his candidacy for the presidency, he pushed the meeting back to November. West said that after his Death Con comment, Alex Jones' producer introduced him to Yiannopoulos, who in turn suggested West "bring Fuentes in". The artist said he was "impressed with Nick" and asked him to join the dinner, explaining that "Trump had no idea who Nick Fuentes was."
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Last week, Trump in a statement called West "a seriously afflicted man who happens to be black" after he joined Fuentes and Yiannopoulos for dinner with the disgraced rapper in Mar-a-Lago.
West announced his rumored campaign for president via a tweet. So far, no candidacy has been submitted to the Federal Electoral Commission. In the meantime, he has begun staffing his campaign, reportedly hiring alt-right political commentator Yiannopoulos, who also worked as an intern in Marjorie Taylor Greene's Congressional Bureau, as his campaign manager.
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KanyeWest
American rapper

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