Melania Trump renegotiated her prenup by refusing to move into the White House in 2017, according to a new book

First Lady Melania Trump reads the children's book "The Little Rabbit" by Nicola Killen during a recording on April 8th before Easter.
The White House
An upcoming book about First Lady Melania Trump reveals some of the strategies behind her otherwise opaque public role.
The Art of Her Deal by Mary Jordan, reporter for the Washington Post, said Melania's Trump Tower Holdout 2017 was part of an effort to renegotiate her marriage agreement with President Donald Trump.
Melania stayed in Manhattan in early 2017, which was very costly for taxpayers to "change their financial arrangement with Trump - what Melania called" taking care of Barron, "" Jordan wrote, according to a Post report before Tuesday's book release.
Jordan wrote that part of the pre-trial renegotiation was to ensure that 14-year-old Barron Trump would have a proper inheritance and place in the Trump organization; His dual American and Slovenian citizenship would enable him to work in Europe.
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According to a new book about the First Lady, Melania Trump's Trump Tower Holdout 2017 has much more to offer than previously known.
"The Art of Her Deal: The Untold Story of Melania Trump" by Washington Post reporter Mary Jordan, released Tuesday, takes a look behind the obscure public role of President Donald Trump's third wife.
When the First Lady didn't move to the White House after the President took office in early 2017, the White House's official line was that she didn't want to disrupt her son Barron Trump's schooling.
However, according to the Post's report on the book prior to its publication, Jordan wrote that Melania actually "wanted to change her financial arrangement with Trump - what Melania called" taking care of Barron ".
Although it was expensive for taxpayers due to Manhattan intelligence details required, Melania's leverage paid off, Jordan said.
In the end, the pre-trial was renegotiated to ensure that 14-year-old Barron would have a proper inheritance and dual citizenship in the U.S. and Slovenia so that he could work for the Trump organization in Europe, according to Jordan.
"She wanted written evidence that Barron would be more like Trump's three oldest children in terms of financial opportunities and inheritance," Jordan wrote.
According to The Post, the book describes the First Lady as more political and committed to her own mythology than her confusing public appearances suggest.
Jordan found that Melania had never received a bachelor's degree, although she swore under oath that she did, and that the earlier Slovenian model also did not correct reports that affected her age.
One of the more than 100 interviews for the book was with former New Jersey governor Chris Christie, who advocated Trump and initially made the transition before being ousted by Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law.
According to The Post, Christie told Jordan that Melania was a crucial sounding board for her husband and was often his first call after returning to his plane from a rally.
"She always had to give him a comment, and I think that says a lot about what he thinks of her," Christie said to Jordan.
Jordan said the first pair was more similar than many Americans might think. "They are both fighters and survivors and gain loyalty over almost everything else," she wrote.
Jordan added, "Neither the very public Trump nor the very private Melania have many close friends. Their loner instincts affect their own marriage."
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