Paris Hilton reveals details of troubled past in documentary

By Alicia Powell
(Reuters) - Paris Hilton went from reality star to businesswoman and now an activist.
The television personality claims in her new documentary "This is Paris" that she was mentally and physically abused as a teenager in a boarding school and is now working to close the school.
"I've had so many people writing me letters saying, 'Thank you very much," said Hilton, 39, who said she hadn't spoken to her parents in 20 years because they were going to Provo Canyon School Utah.
In the documentary that premiered on her YouTube page this month, Hilton claims she was mentally and physically abused, held in solidarity detention for hours, and forced to take unknown drugs.
Reuters has been unable to independently confirm their claims.
Hilton said she was sent to Provo and several other schools after years of rebellion over troubled teenagers.
In response to Hilton's allegations, Provo Canyon School sent a statement that read, in part, “We are aware of media references to Provo Canyon School. Please note that PCS was sold by its previous owner in August 2000. We are therefore unable to provide any comments on operations or patient experiences prior to this time. "
The school also stated, “In the past two decades, mental health care has evolved from a behavioral foundation to a personalized, trauma-related approach. We work with extremely complex people who are often a danger to themselves and others. Provo Canyon School is committed to the safety of our patients and employees. "
The film's original premise was to pinpoint Hilton as a businesswoman and clear up any misunderstandings about her, but during filming, she began to open up to her director.
"I felt so comfortable with her and told her about my nightmares and a bit of the story," said Hilton.
Although Hilton initially didn't want the abuse problem in the film, "the director pushed me more and more. And then I realized that this could actually help a lot of people and empower others."
Hilton said she was excited to use her real voice in place of the baby voice that made her famous to make a difference.
"It's exhausting just pretending to have no brain and no idea what's going on. I've been doing this for so long.
"I'm not a stupid blond guy. I'm very good at pretending to be one," she said.


(Reporting by Alicia Powell; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)
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