People Who Grew Up Poor But Ended Up Dating Or Marrying Wealthy Are Sharing Their Most Eye-Opening Experiences

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There are some people in the world for whom money is not an issue. But for most people, the idea of ​​being careless with cash or being able to afford certain luxuries is difficult to grasp.
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And sometimes people from these two worlds clash. So I collected stories from the BuzzFeed Community and r/askreddit of people who were struggling financially but ended up in a relationship with someone super wealthy. Here are some of their experiences and the most revealing things they learned.
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1. "Keeping up with her was hard. She wanted trips to Europe, expensive vacations, expensive restaurants, etc. She had good money and I had limited funds and had to distribute it. I couldn't just fly it to the Caribbean in the blink of an eye. So she dumped me in exchange for a guy who could."
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—u/deleted
2. "My ex had roommate problems at college, so her parents bought her a condo to live in while she finished college. They immediately sold them for a profit. I couldn't even imagine being in this situation. She also assumed her family was lower-middle class because she didn't live in a mansion like many of her friends. She was very humble and wise with her money, but it was very clear that she could call her parents if something wasn't working out."
—u/MakeRobAPirat
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3. "My partner just expects things to work out because they always have for her. Often there is no backup plan. When you are poor, you are constantly planning minute by minute what will happen if suddenly X, Y, or Z fails.”
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—u/astro_scientician
4. “How do they support each other without worrying about it. My husband and I moved into our first home with no gadgets and his parents bought us all brand new gadgets. He quickly thanked me and I was amazed. I kept telling him, 'We need to be more grateful!' But that's just how they are."
-Anonymous
5. "You pay for everything. It just comes naturally, which is strange as I come from a family that always takes the time to split the bill. Dinner, hotels, everything. If we visit them, it's on them.”
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-Anonymous
6. “I dated a senator's daughter in high school. It was all about appearances and we had to be careful where we went public. Her parents offered to get me nicer clothes if we went to dinner, but I felt weird about it. That relationship didn't last long."
—u/onett
7. "I married a rich woman. My wife is a gem, but the problem is that my mother-in-law's expectations and image are always at the heart of almost every single decision."
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—u/rtillaree
8. "On a Friday night, on a whim, my friend decided that she wanted cake. I suggested we go to the store and buy one, but she called her favorite restaurant and had the chef bake her favorite cake. It cost $170. A cake . She could afford it, but the problem was the complete lack of value. Nothing really mattered to her because she had so much money.
—u/Infamous-Arm3955
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9. "I've learned that quality really makes a difference in everything from the clothes to the ingredients."
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—u/LaterTowel9403
10. "I learned how productive you can be when you have money. Something needs to be repaired or replaced? We can afford that. Want to do something fun or adventurous? Sure, let's go now. Do you want to eat healthier? Simple, we can buy all the ingredients. It's amazing what you can do when your life isn't slowed down by a million different things that need to be fixed, upgraded, replaced, or saved."
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—u/capricious_achelois
11. "I grew up poor and my husband grew up very comfortable in comparison. Eating out was a real luxury for us. We never ordered a drink because water was free. My husband doesn't understand as many of these things as he does, privileges are taken for granted. Dining out is a privilege, new school supplies, new clothes, new shoes, new everything. I worked illegally when I was 13 so I could start buying my own supplies. I wouldn't wish for my upbringing for everyone, but I wish people could see the other side of things."
—sweety7946
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12. "I was shocked at the number of times my girlfriends just booked flights and went on vacation. She flew more in one summer than I have in my entire life.”
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—u/Aperture_T
13. "People born into money think they know what it's like to be middle class or poor, but they can't even begin to understand it. I grew up thinking that getting a meal at McDonald's would be something for myself. I worked 40 hours a week at a gas station while taking 21 credit hours at a public university. Now I'm a department head at a pharmaceutical company. When I hear the stories about all my girlfriend's rich classmates who go to Europe to 'study' in a prestigious MBA program, 'it makes me cringe imply that this corresponds to the lower middle class.
—u/raynorelyp
14. "When I was in college, I dated a girl from a wealthy family, and I was very poor. The most frustrating thing for me was that our definition of "crisis" was so different. From month to month I literally wouldn't know if I could afford my rent or be able to fill up my car and she would freak out over a little social issue or if a store carried a fashion brand she liked. "
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—u/Supreme0lost0rd
15. "How real the whole concept of a 'network' or 'bubble' really is. It's this weird community of people with money (and therefore power) who are willing to make things happen for you as long as you're in. I met people at a fundraiser or something and five minutes later they were happy to take a call who got me a job at a big company. Or my boyfriend at the time suggested we go to a concert. Tickets are $180 but that's ok because a friend's parents have a box so we're going to join them. Or even once the dishwasher in our apartment broke but we didn't have to pay a penny to fix it because his friend's parents owned the building so they fixed it for free as a favour."
—u/PhiloPhocion
16. "I dated a girl who came off old money for three years. She was fine, but her family was so disconnected from the real world. They were nice people but incredibly remote from the rest of the world. They asked me what it was like going to public school and how my parents immigrated. They were amazed that not everyone had a vacation home or traveled often. But the most interesting thing I learned is that old money is much more powerful than new money. Her family belonged to these 'clubs' made up of other wealthy families and the impact they had was overwhelming."
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—u/edwadokun
17. "My wife's family has no idea what a workday is.
—u/chumabuma
18. "I remember when we were kids, our home appliances used to die. Watching my mom (with four kids) keep figuring out how the dryer broke made me wonder how she was going to afford the laundromat was something I will never forget. I married a man from a wealthy family and I was blown away when he wanted to replace our tea towels just because they looked shabby. I was used to using tea towels until they disappeared. To me, getting new tea towels was a ridiculously frivolous idea."
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—u/Wexylu
19. "I grew up poor (now middle class) and when I was 18 I dated a super rich man. The first thing I noticed was the difference in the food we ate. Not just the quantities, but the ingredients (things like oysters, fresh fish, olives) things my parents could never buy."
—u/Friendly-Sea1979
20. “I grew up in the lower class and my partner in a comfortable middle class household. I notice many differences that keep surprising me, but an important one is the fact that university has always been a big dream for me. I thought maybe I would go there after starting adult education and the change, but that was certainly not a matter of course. With my partner, on the other hand, it was always assumed that he could go to any school he could or wanted to go to.”
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—3llafish
21. "I grew up lower middle class and both my parents grew up poor, so there was a certain mentality ingrained in me. My SO grew up in a wealthy family and never had to save money. Money was always easy there Holidays were a rare pleasure for me but a normal part of life for him so he was overwhelmed by my plans to backpack or stay in hostels to save money. I teach him the beauty of frugality and saving money, and he appreciates how well I can stock our fridge to run a smooth household on a budget. He respects the fact that I only spend money when necessary. I also taught him to be a little more frugal.”
—Luckie11eleven
22. "I struggled with the feeling that I would always live off her family's tails instead of finding my own way in the world."
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—u/FuckCazadors
23. "I got married into a rich family and it's an eye opener. I didn't grow up poor, but I was far from rich. We had a baby last year, and my husband's grandma bought us a house...in cash. I feel uncomfortable when his family gives me gifts because they always cost a lot. One Christmas we got $10,000 in a card. It's a different world that I still don't fit into and I'm uncomfortable in it.
—ccat
24. "My friend had no idea about saving money. It was always there simply because its money always made money. Having money was a source of income in and of itself. Besides, he had no idea how much anything cost. If I wanted to buy some groceries for dinner, he would give me $300 to buy some basic groceries."
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The story goes on

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