President Trump Claims Coronavirus Will 'Fade Away' Even Without Vaccine as Cases Rise in U.S.

Donald Trump said on Wednesday that he was confident that the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) would "fade" even if a vaccine was not made.
"We are very close to a vaccine and we are very close to therapeutics, really good therapeutics," the 74-year-old president told Fox News. "But even without that, I don't even like to talk about it because." it fades, it will fade. But having a vaccine would be really nice and it will happen. "
Since the pandemic started, Trump has argued that the virus would go away.
"It will go away. One day it will be a miracle, it will go away," he said at the end of February, weeks before his tone about the corona virus became significantly more serious.
His comments to Fox News this week come as several states, including Arizona, Florida and Texas, have the highest number of new coronavirus cases to date. According to a New York Times tracker, the national average of daily cases is also on the up.
RELATED: Dr. Fauci says he last spoke to President Trump about "vaccine development" two weeks ago.
According to many of the country's best doctors, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, a key member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, is expected to have a vaccine available in early 2021 at the earliest.
By Thursday morning, the novel corona virus had killed at least 117,743 people in the United States, according to the Times, while at least 2.16 million confirmed cases of the virus were reported nationwide.
Fauci, the country's leading infectious disease expert, expressed concern that home stay orders in certain states were being lifted too quickly, undermining the effectiveness of social distancing in slowing new infections.
"I think there have certainly been countries that have not strictly followed the guidelines that we have set for the reopening of America," Fauci told Tuesday's NPR 1A program, adding, "There were clearly states that who decided it themselves went ahead and opened to varying degrees, maybe even - I wouldn’t say it too early - but certainly before they reached the benchmarks they needed to get. "
MANDEL NGAN / Getty Images Dr. Anthony Fauci (left) and President Donald Trump during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on April 13.
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Fauci has also said that he is "cautiously optimistic" that one of the ongoing coronavirus vaccine trials in the United States will prove successful and that the country will have "a few hundred million doses" by early 2021.
"I am cautiously optimistic that with the numerous candidates that we have on different platforms, we will have a vaccine that has a level of efficacy that makes it usable," he told CNN earlier this month.
But unlike Fauci, Trump and his government have apparently given the corona virus less priority in recent weeks.
On Tuesday, Vice President Mike Pence said in a comment published in the Wall Street Journal that concerns about a second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic were "exaggerated."
Pence, head of the Trump administration's Corona Virus Task Force, argued in his statement that "the media has set itself the task of ringing the alarm bells" regarding a second wave of the virus.
As information about the coronavirus pandemic changes rapidly, PEOPLE strives to provide the latest data in our reporting. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest information on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO and local health authorities. Donate to Direct Relief to provide life-saving medical resources to doctors and nurses at the forefront.

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