Queen Elizabeth II was a longtime automotive enthusiast

Since driving licences, number plates and passports were issued in their own names, Queen Elizabeth II did not need them to drive and travel. Just before she turned 19, she began combining the two, joining the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) Transport Division in 1945 to train as a vehicle mechanic. Wanting to help the British effort during World War II, she would drive an ambulance - one that she could theoretically fix as well if it broke. The war ended before she graduated as an Honorary Junior Commander, the other ATS members nicknamed her Princess Auto Mechanic.
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We don't know if it made it under the bonnets of the many official state vehicles and the far more numerous unofficial fleet in the royal garages, but it was driving around England itself that year. Here is a small sample of royal transport used during their 70 year reign.
Golden State Coach (1762)
Although she never drove it, a tour of any royal garage should start with the carriage. King George III commissioned Samuel Butler to build it in 1760. Butler spent two years on the gilded carriage, which was 24 feet long and more than 12 feet high. The quarters are suspended from the frame with leather straps, so the occupants will be flung about even on a slow walk as fast as the eight Windsor Gray horses can pull it. It wasn't until the 1900s that King George VI rubberized the wooden wheels. They say the queen didn't like it.
1953 Land Rover Series 1
Land Rover presented Queen Elizabeth's father, King George VI, with the 100th example of the 80 series off the assembly line in 1948. She picked up the Landie habit five years later when a 1953 Series 1 with a custom 86-inch wheelbase was part of the fleet used for her six-month tour of the Commonwealth in 1953 and 1954. This Land Rover became the State IV ceremonial vehicle. The models above were built in Australia as near-copies of the Commonwealth Tour vehicle in 1958, when Australia decided to have six identical versions for royal service.
The royal family is believed to have gone through around 30 Land Rover series cars and Defenders since then, and many of the most common photos of them pose in or near a car, particularly the Defender built just for them in 2002. The Royal Family isn't done with it either: a recent Defender 110 served as a luggage van for family members heading to Balmoral Castle in the Queen's final days.
1954 Rolls Royce Phantom IV State Landaulette
No one should be surprised that the English royal family enjoyed Rolls-Royce merchandise and rumor has it that the Queen liked their Spirit of Ecstasy cars. Rolls-Royce made fewer than 20 examples of the Rolls-Royce Phantom IV - Rolls-Royce built them exclusively for customers deemed worthy - and the Queen owned two. A closed-top limousine delivered on 6 July 1950 while still Duchess of Edinburgh. Rolls-Royce built this open landaulet during its 1954 Jubilee year which was loaned to the Royal Family in the 1950s, the Queen eventually purchasing it in 1959 to serve as a state vehicle.
Other Rolls-Royce in service with the Royal Family included a 1960 Rolls-Royce Phantom V 'High Roof' State Limousine, a 1962 Rolls-Royce Phantom V used by the Queen Mother and a Rolls-Royce Phantom VI Limousine by 1977 built for the Royal Family Queen's Silver Jubilee, a 1985 Rolls-Royce 'Centenary' Silver Spur Saloon that Princess Diana would use, a 1987 Phantom VI State Limousine and another Phantom IV that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle would use brought to her wedding.
The story goes on

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