Queen granted permission to repair Buckingham Palace roof - 200 years after leak spotted

The roof of Buckingham Palace has been leaking for some time. (PA pictures)
Part of the roof of Buckingham Palace is being repaired almost 200 years after a leak was first discovered.
Westminster City Council has given permission to restore the Queen's house in London. He examined an application for the repair of an asphalt roof and chimney.
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While it might be assumed that a problem in a royal residence would be solved quickly, it seems that this problem has been on the to-do list since 1831.
The papers submitted as part of the application for work included notes from this year that read: “Rain had already entered the southwestern tower cover, and although cracks in the composition could be slightly close together, there was no guarantee that they would not be repeated.
"So replacing a more durable cover was recommended."
The cover consisted of a mixture of "Stockholm tar, dried chalk and sifted sand", which was applied in two batches, each about half an inch thick.
The roof was opened for inspection at the end of January, and the report says it is in "very bad condition" with "severe blisters and cracks".
The queen currently lives in Windsor Castle. (Getty Images)
Read More: Buckingham Palace Floor Plans Revealed: Exactly What Is In The Queen's Main Residence
Martin Ashley Architects from Twickenham in West London looked at the work and said it would be “largely like for how”.
The section being worked on is part of the North Range, which was the second part developed when the palace was revalued from its origins in Buckingham House.
Buckingham House was first owned by the ruling monarch in 1762 when King George III. Bought it as a private home for his wife Queen Charlotte.
His son wanted it to be extensively rebuilt when he came to the throne, and John Nash was tasked with turning the house into a palace, expanding the central block, and rebuilding two wings.
The palace is not open for visits this summer. (PA pictures)
But he spent far too much and after George IV died, the Prime Minister fired Nash.
Read more: The Queen's official birthday is marked with a new military ceremony at Windsor Castle
Wilhelm IV was not interested in living in the palace during his reign, and even offered it to parliament when his houses were damaged by fire in 1830. While the parliament was not moving, work continued so that it could have royal benefits.
Under Queen Victoria, Buckingham Palace became more or less the well-known royal residence with extensive renovations that even moved the Marble Arch to make room for work.
She was the first ruler to rule from Buckingham Palace and ended years when St. James's Palace was the official seat of the monarchy.
The palace normally opens for summer tours of the state rooms and gardens, but its doors won't open this year as officials say it would be difficult to comply with the rules of social distancing.
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