Senate clears $2.3 trillion government spending, COVID-19 relief package, sending it to Trump's desk

The Senate overwhelmingly passed the combined $ 1.4 trillion government spending and $ 900 billion COVID-19 aid package on Monday night, and sent the bipartisan legislation to President Trump's desk. Trump is expected to sign the bill that was passed in House 359-53 on Monday night. The Senate approved the bill with 91 votes to 7. It will be the last bill Congress will vote on this year unless Trump veto the National Defense Authorization Act.
The $ 1.4 trillion portion of the bill will fund the government through September 30, 2021, and the COVID-19 stimulus package approves $ 600 direct payments to most Americans, grants small business loans, extends unemployment benefits of the federal government and an eviction moratorium provides money for tenants, schools and food stamps, among other things. The package also creates Smithsonian museums focused on women and Latinos, puts an end to the medical billing surprise, and allows tax deductions for business lunches. It's all wrapped up in one massive 5,600-page bill, which is among the longest laws ever considered in Congress.
More stories from theweek.com
Texas is deviating from national vaccination guidelines and will prioritize over 65 age groups over key workers
Are the worst days of the Trump presidency yet to come?
The former FDA chief believes the new mutation of COVID-19 found in the UK is "already in the US".
In this article
Election Center 2020
Donald Trump

You should check here to buy the best price guaranteed products.

Last News

Nurse struck with bike, called anti-Asian slur on NYC subway

Ex-Nurse Who Sexually Assaulted, Impregnated Incapacitated Patient Gets 10 Years

Michigan school shooting suspect and his parents isolated at same jail, sheriff says

Paris Hilton says she 'hated' sister Nicky Hilton's bridesmaid dresses: 'They were just itchy, uncomfortable'

Tyra Banks Celebrates Her 48th Birthday with Sultry Photoshoot and Body Positive Message

Baristas Are Sharing The Stereotypes They Assign To Popular Drink Orders, And I Feel Called Out