'Spider-Man' star Tony Revolori is done with Hollywood's excuses and he's ready to take the lead

Actor Tony Revolori spoke to Insider about representation in Hollywood, his favorite roles and upcoming projects. The Walt Disney Company via Getty Images; insider
More
"Spider-Man" star Tony Revolori is climbing his way to becoming Hollywood's leading man, and carving a place for Latinx actors in the process.
Revolori, who was born in California and is of Guatemalan descent, told Insider that he had two opinions when he started acting professionally as a kid.
"There was a realist who understood what I was getting, and then there was the young idealist who wanted to play all the characters, from superheroes to lightsaber wielding."
ADVERTISEMENT
Nothing could have prepared Revolori for the realities of Hollywood as the industry is "constantly changing," but he experienced added adversity as a person of color.
"I felt like it just wasn't benefiting me in the way I needed it, that I wanted it, and that I saw it was good for other people," the actor said. "And it wore me down a little bit, but through perseverance, here I am and I'm still standing."
Tony Revolori in September 2022 Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
To say that Revolori "still stands" today is an understatement. His determination to do his best in auditions is exactly what has landed the 26-year-old actor roles in high-profile projects.
ADVERTISEMENT
The lead role as Zero Moustafa, a refugee lobby boy and eventual heir to the titular hotel, in Wes Anderson's 2014 film The Grand Budapest Hotel changed Revolori's career.
By this point, Revolori had booked minor roles in television shows and commercials. But in The Grand Budapest Hotel, packed with veteran actors, he appeared in most of the film's scenes alongside costar Ralph Fiennes, who played Zero's mentor and hotel concierge M. Gustave.
Ralph Fiennes and Tony Revolori in The Grand Budapest Hotel. Fox Searchlight Pictures
Revolori said the critically acclaimed film, which won four Oscars, completely changed the way it was perceived in Hollywood.
"It just gave people a chance to look my way, you know? Even in a room in a regular audition, I would have something to support me, which is incredibly helpful," he said. "It definitely changed the way people looked at me. People still didn't know much, but they definitely wanted to know more.”
Revolori followed up on the success of The Grand Budapest Hotel by landing the role of Flash Thompson in Jon Watts' 2017 Spider-Man reboot starring Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man.
Following previous iterations helmed by Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield as Marvel web-slingers, Spider-Man: Homecoming was more diverse and reflected New York City, a melting pot of cultures.
Characters in Peter's inner circle who are white in the comics, such as his best friends Ned Leeds and MJ, were played by Jacob Batalon and Zendaya, respectively.
Prior to Holland's casting, Revolori entered an all-racial audition for the role of Web-Slinger. Feeling the pressure to prove he could play the iconic character, he did a lot of research beforehand.
"It seems like a common occurrence that we go into a part like this where you want it so badly that you're willing to do more than anyone else," Revolori explained. “But it's going to be a difficult thing when you're not even being considered for it before moving on. I think the problem is they let us all audition, but did we even get a chance?”
Tom Holland and Tony Revolori in Spider-Man: Homecoming. Sony Pictures/Marvel Studios
Revolori admitted his experience was made worse by a lack of confidence.
"I'm sure they would tell you otherwise because they're way too nice, but I remember absolutely bombing the audition because I didn't believe in myself I could say, 'Yeah, me can be Spider-Man 'I'm going to be Spider-Man' because there's no depiction there, not in the comics," he said.
Marvel Comics includes various web-slingers such as Miles Morales, who is Afro-Latino, and Miguel O'Hara/Spider-Man 2099, who is of Irish and Mexican descent," but the idea that you have to make an entirely new character with these Acting is difficult," Revolori said.
"The fact that I've never seen anyone who looks like me made me feel, 'Will I be able to do this? Is that real that I can actually have a shot at it?' And it kind of ends up shaking your belief system."
From left, Spider-Man: Homecoming stars Jacob Batalon, Laura Harrier, Tom Holland, Tony Revolori, Zendaya, and director Jon Watts at San Diego Comic-Con International July 10'6
More
After auditioning for Spider-Man and then Ned, Revolori was asked to read for the high school bully.
When Revolori landed the role of Flash, a tall, white, blue-eyed jock in the source material, comic fans online voiced their dissatisfaction. His initial reaction was "very scathing" and he was tempted to call out the critics but "realized there was no point".
Instead, he changed his mindset to "don't care" what they thought.
Playing Flash in Homecoming, Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019), and Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021) was even more special for Revolori because he didn't really see himself represented on-screen grow up.
"As a Latino, I never had the 'Black Panther' or 'Crazy Rich Asians' moment," he said. "As far as I know, no other family members of mine have any friends."
Revolori was pleased that his younger brother "got to see a lot of different people" on screen as he joined him for the premiere of Homecoming.
"I'm glad it's more accessible to the next generation, but I think we still have a little more work to do," he said.
Mario Revolori, Benjamin Revolori and Tony Revolori at the Los Angeles premiere of Spider-Man: Homecoming in June 2017. Todd Williamson/Getty Images
Revolori is "incredibly grateful" that younger people can feel seen by Latinx actors in the Marvel Cinematic Universe like Oscar Isaac, Salma Hayek and Xochitl Gomez.
"Black Panther: Wakanda Forever").
"It was nice that everyone was there and speaking Spanish and even had a little moment among us to be a little amazed and enjoy what we're on offer here," he reflected.
The actor said sustained diversity in Hollywood can be achieved by "telling stories with people of color at the forefront," giving underrepresented voices a chance to be heard, and giving actors a chance "to audition for something that this does not have to be the case”. necessarily be defined by race.”
"I'd like to go into an audition for 'Spider-Man' and not feel like I don't deserve the chance or feel like I don't have a chance from the second I walk in, you know? "
In December, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige confirmed to the New York Times that a fourth Spider-Man movie was in development. Five months later, Sony chairman Tom Rothman told Deadline he was optimistic the studio would start work on the film soon, hopefully with Watts, Holland and Zendaya.
No further details have been released since then, but Revolori has expressed interest in reprising his role as the Flash.
"I'd like to revisit the character," he said. "He's someone I respect very much. As a brown man, playing that role is important. I had a wonderful time with them and would love to continue if they had me."
Ideally, Revolori would like to "push the character to further new depths" and "explore a little more Flash and see who he is behind the phone."
Jacob Batalon as Ned and Tony Revolori as Flash in Spider-Man: No Way Home. Sony Pictures/Marvel Studios
Regardless of whether or not Revolori gets a call from Marvel, his future looks bright.
He will star in his third Anderson film, titled Asteroid City, with the likes of Willem Dafoe, Margot Robbie, Scarlett Johansson and Bryan Cranston.
"I had the best time, the story is great and it's Wes Anderson, so there's a lot of symmetry and color and crazy moments that are wonderful, with a lot of heart at the center," said Revolori, adding he loves the director " intimately".
Revolori will also appear in "Scream 6," which Woodsboro will drop for NYC. Revolori admitted he's "never seen a 'Scream' movie," but star Mason Gooding "sold me why it's such a phenomenal set, why the directors are phenomenal and why the producers are amazing."
"And he wasn't wrong," Revolori said. "I had the best time on set."
"It's a really, really fun script and there are a lot of twists and turns," he added.
Revolori is also excited for the chance to "expand my own universe" by writing, producing and directing.
"I try to look for characters that I would like to play regardless of race," he said. "There are great stories that can be told from a Latin perspective that I would love to tell and be a part of."
Revolori said that one of the most common excuses why people of color aren't getting as many opportunities is that they're not perceived as "financially viable." So he's trying to "position himself in a leading role and show that we can be at the forefront of the film."
"That's my goal now, to continue to push that narrative and give us an opportunity to move away from that excuse and tell incredible stories," he said. "At the end of the day, this is something I want to do to help people of color."
"But at the same time, I'm an actor through and through," he continued, "I adore this industry, and I want to do the dumbest, coolest shit I care about and be a part of some of the greatest original stories yet to be told." ."
Read the original article on Insider
Tony Revolori
US-American actor
Tom Holland
English actor

Last News

Putin requires increased production for war although plants already working several shifts

Putin requires increased production for war although plants already working several shifts

Just like Richard Fierro in Colorado Springs, data shows that 64 unarmed civilians have apprehended the gunman in mass shootings since 2000

Just like Richard Fierro in Colorado Springs, data shows that 64 unarmed civilians have apprehended the gunman in mass shootings since 2000

You better have good insurance before you brave one of the 10 deadliest roads in the US

You better have good insurance before you brave one of the 10 deadliest roads in the US