SRX: What What Right, What Went Wrong in Season 2

Credit: Jason Miller/SRX - Getty Images
The second season of the Superstar Racing Experience (SRX) came and went in literally the blink of an eye – well, if that eye blinked for six weeks, that is, and then it was gone for another year.
Marco Andretti won the second championship of the series, his first title since he began racing Indy cars well over a decade ago.
And while SRX isn't an IndyCar, the third-generation racer now joins his legendary grandfather Mario and father Michael, who have won multiple CART and USAC titles together, as racing series champions.
ADVERTISEMENT
Andretti also joined series co-founder Tony Stewart as the SRX King, as Stewart won the inaugural championship in the series' inaugural season last year.
Autoweek ends the 2022 season with some of the things that we think went right and others that went wrong.
Buckle up and start your engines, SRX fans:
WHAT WENT RIGHT
Credit: Jared Tilton/SRX - Getty Images
1, stars shone in the cabin
While the action on the track was good and engaging most of the time, especially with all the wrecks and the outbursts (examples: Tony Stewart and Ernie Francis Jr. or Paul Tracy and pretty much everyone else), for us the brightest star was the Lead play-by-play voice cast by Alan Bestwick (and extra kudos to show host Lindsay Czarniak and main pit reporter Matt Yocum).
Bestwick did a great job letting TV viewers know who was doing what, which drivers were having conflicts with their peers and especially the late race action as the cars swarmed towards the checkered flag. If we had to give Bestwick a grade it would be A+.
Credit: Jason Miller/SRX - Getty Images
2, All good, mechanically speaking
From a mechanical standpoint, the SRX mechanics and manufacturers could put many NASCAR crews to shame. They were able to keep cars running even after some serious crashes in the race (I can only recall one car being so thoroughly wrecked in a race that a driver had to go to a spare car within the same event) and were also able to expertly handle major repairs in the week-long period between races, most of the time en route, track to track. These people also get an A+.
Credit: Dylan Buell/SRX - Getty Images
3. Championship Chase was top notch
The four-rider championship battle between Andretti, Tony Stewart, Ryan Newman and Bobby Labonte was exceptional. While I'll admit I'm a bit surprised that Stewart didn't play a bigger role in the season finale/championship decider event, I'm sure as much as Tony hates to lose, he was justifiably glad he didn't dare has title again that Marco did.
Credit: Dylan Buell/SRX - Getty Images
4 was the CBS production crew on their A-game
Kudos also need to be given to the entire CBS production team. They stayed connected, rarely missed a big moment (even during commercial breaks), and gave special credit for their work after a monstrous storm roared through Nashville overnight, putting the event itself in jeopardy (there was significant property and... system damage). Nevertheless, they went through the live broadcast without any problems.
Credit: Dylan Buell/SRX - Getty Images
5, series Finally found a villain
One of the highlights of the six races was the rise of Paul Tracy to become the series' villain, a role he seemed at first to dread before seeming to embrace.
The story goes on

Last News

Malcom Brown released by Jacksonville Jaguars in surprise move following career year

NASCAR's Daniel Suarez Issues A Strong Warning To New Teammate Kimi Räikkönen

Former NFL player and 'AGT' finalist fumbles magic trick during live show

Former NFL player and 'AGT' finalist fumbles magic trick during live show

Trump 'endorses' Dan Goldman, the lawyer who led his impeachment, amid a confounding string of Truth Social posts praising Democrats

Trump 'endorses' Dan Goldman, the lawyer who led his impeachment, amid a confounding string of Truth Social posts praising Democrats