Though Trump had a reputation for avoiding briefings and flushing meeting notes, he would ask officials for documents: 'Can I keep this?'

U.S. President Donald Trump holds his notes as he discusses his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a meeting with House Republicans in the Cabinet Room of the White House July 17, 2018 in Washington, DC.
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As President, Donald Trump had a reputation for being difficult to brief and shred meeting notes.
At times he asked officials if he could keep documents he received, his associates said.
"From time to time the president would say, 'Can I keep this?'" Trump's former chief of staff told CNN.
During his presidency, Donald Trump developed a reputation for being difficult to brief and may have destroyed meeting notes by flushing them down the toilet, but he asked officials to keep the documents obtained, his staff said.
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Trump's reluctance to attend the Presidential Daily Briefing during his tenure has been well documented. His first briefer, Ted Gistaro, told CBS News the former president "doesn't really read anything," while intelligence officials called him "by far the most difficult" new president to brief. The daily briefing was delivered to Vice President Mike Pence more often than to the President, The Guardian reported.
Hoping to encourage the president to read more of his briefings, Gistaro's successor, Beth Sanner, included a one-page outline and a series of charts narrated by former CIA officer John Helgerson in his book, Getting to Know the President .
Former President Trump allegedly destroyed records when attending meetings, including by flushing written notes down the White House restrooms. He also had a habit of tearing up and shredding documents, the Washington Post reported. The shredding was so productive, according to Politico, that an entire team was busy gluing documents back together for safekeeping.
"I've seen Trump rip papers, not into little, little pieces, but usually twice — so take a piece of paper, rip it once, and then rip it again, and then throw it in the trash can," the Washington Post reported that Michael said Cohen, Trump's former personal attorney.
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In addition to his habit of shredding meeting notes, several employees noted that Trump would ask officials if he could keep documents that he received.
"From time to time the president said, 'Can I keep this?'" Trump's former chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told CNN's Erin Burnett on Friday. Mulvaney added the White House has "entire teams" of people dedicated to storing official documents.
Though Mulvaney would not draw a direct line between Trump's habit of demanding records and the search of his Mar-a-Lago residence looking for classified documents, his comments echoed those of John Bolton, Trump's former national security adviser.
"Many times the president would say [to Intelligence officials], 'Well, can I keep that?'" Bolton told CBS News. "And in my experience, most of the time the news anchors would say, 'Well sir, we'd rather take that back,' but sometimes they forgot."
Read the original article on Business Insider
donald trump
45th President of the United States
Mick Mulvaney
Director of the Office of Administration and Budget; White House Chief of Staff

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