Trump has (yet another) bad legal day

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It was a nightmare day for Donald Trump in court. Again.
Since leaving the White House, the former president has not been short of legal and political backlashes. But in recent weeks, the sheer volume of imminent threats -- both criminal and civilian -- have put Trump in a bind like he's never faced before.
On Tuesday, those threats escalated. The Supreme Court has put Trump's tax returns in the hands of House Democrats for years, and a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals -- which included two of Trump's own appointments -- appeared poised to rule on a case involving it to decide in favor of the Ministry of Justice seizure of documents from Mar-a-Lago.
Trump has not been convicted of any crimes and has maintained his innocence and victimhood in all matters. But as he enters his third run for the presidency, the pressure he faces from prosecutors and legal opponents casts an increasingly ominous shadow. Among them:
Attorney General Merrick Garland has appointed a special counsel -- Corruption Prosecutor Jack Smith -- to oversee the Mar-a-Lago investigation, matters arising from Trump's efforts to evade the 2020 election and the transfer of power to Joe BIden to prevent.
The Jan. 6 selection committee is preparing to release a massive report and 1,000 witness transcripts that could provide more explosive evidence of Trump's attempt to subvert the 2020 election and advance the DOJ's ongoing criminal investigation into the matter.
Trump's business empire was placed under the scrutiny of Monitor Barbara Jones in the wake of New York Attorney General Tish James' lawsuit alleging widespread fraud against Trump, his businesses and family members.
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An Atlanta-area district attorney has reached deep into Trump's inner circle to obtain testimony about Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 Georgia election. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Tuesday became the youngest witness to provide substantive testimony to the special grand jury.
This week's mounting legal woes come as Trump continues to fend off political enemies and establishes his place in an evolving social media landscape. For now, Trump has decided to remain on his own media platform, despite an invitation from Twitter owner Elon Musk to allow Trump back on the site. But even that was complicated by problems. The delayed merger between Trump's own social media company and a blank check company that would take it public raised renewed concerns about possible securities breaches that would provide additional fodder for political opponents and make way for further investigations.
Trump is no stranger to legal ties and predictions of impending doom. His political obituary was written amid a 2017 investigation and subsequent impeachment inquiry launched by Special Counsel Robert Mueller into his efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political rivals. This has led to a perverse mentality -- the more Trump seems to be under siege, the livelier his base becomes and the more he dominates political talks and crowds out potential rivals.
It's a dynamic Trump and his team are well aware of, and one that served as a rallying cry during Trump's 2024 presidential announcement at Mar-a-Lago last week.
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"It's incredible that since his announcement in 2016, Democrats have been trying to get his tax records," said a person close to Trump. "If they can do that to him, imagine what 87,000 new IRS agents can do to ordinary Americans."
But Trump is now bereft of his strongest defense: the office of the presidency itself, which provided safeguards and procedural obstacles for investigators no longer available to him. Instead, courts have rebuffed his efforts to assert executive privileges as he could during his tenure, and shot down repeated efforts by his and his allies to obstruct criminal and congressional investigators.
And the limits of Trump's post-presidency influence were made clear in this month's midterm elections, when predictions of a "red tsunami" met Democratic resilience in a number of seats once thought to be within Republican reach.
Despite the disappointing results, the ex-president has continued to press ahead with his presidential announcement, in part to protect him from the legal scrutiny he faces. Several people familiar with his announcement plans said he was adamant he was sending a message of strength by not delaying it, despite senior party officials asking him to wait until after the Georgia Senate runoff in December. There was a belief that he would effectively freeze the field and possibly protect himself legally.
There were also political benefits. Trump's team saw a surge in fundraising and popularity following the Mar-a-lago raid in August, and the former president has garnered sympathy from certain constituents who view him as a political victim.
As the legal dominoes fell on Tuesday, people close to Trump touted his strength in the early 2024 primaries, and his campaign promoted articles questioning the integrity of the special counsel.
“It makes him look like a political fighter. He's the master of framing," said a Republican strategist close to Trump's team. "And he wants to be a political martyr."

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